Training Secrets of TaekwonDo

An old proverb says that even heaven cannot make a diligent worker poor. However, in TaekwonDo, diligence or intensive training alone does not produce quality techniques.   On the contrary, instructions from a false or unqualified instructor would be worse than not being taught at all because unscientific movements not only reduce the power but require a tremendous amount of time to correct. On the other hand, under the proper […]

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TaekwonDo Stances

Stances are the foundation on which every technique is built. If the stance is weak or incorrect, then any technique will be weakened or may even become ineffective. When performing a pattern at a competition this will result in lost points; when using Taekwondo in a real life situation this could result in defeat. There are many different stances in Taekwondo, each with its own purpose and application. We practice […]

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Student Oath

The TaekwonDo oath is often recited before a lesson, or at the beginning of a grading. “I shall observe the tenets of TaekwonDo I shall respect my instructor and seniors I shall never misuse TaekwonDo I shall be a champion of freedom and justice I shall build a more peaceful world” Let us consider the purpose and meaning of the oath in more detail: I shall observe the tenets of […]

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Patterns – Detailed Information

Chon-Ji Chon Ji has 19 movements diagrammed as a cross (or plus sign). Literally, Chon-Ji translates as “heaven – earth” which is interpreted as the creation of the world. It is therefore the initial pattern performed by an ITF beginner during their entrance into the world of Taekwon-Do. When the two words Chon Ji are combined, they take on a different meaning: Lake Chon-Ji is the Heavenly Lake, located in […]

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History of TaekwonDo

Translated from Korean, “TAE” literally means to jump, kick or smash with the foot, “KWON” means to punch or destroy with the hand or fist and “DO” means art, way or method.  Therefore Taekwondo means foot, hand, way. Choi Hong Hi is widely regarded as the ‘Founder of Taekwondo’. Taekwondo was developed by Choi in Korea during the 1940s as a combination of Korean Taek Kyon and Japanese Karate. Taekwondo is […]

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Korean Pronunciation

Correct pronunciation of Taekwondo terms in Korean can be tricky, especially if all we have to learn from is a textbook. Click the link below to go to itkd.co.nz which is a really nice site.  There is a great section on Korean pronunciation, spoken by a Korean master. Click Here

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Counting in Korean

There are two different numbering systems that are used by Koreans. The first numbering system is used when counting, or when only speaking of the numbers themselves. This is what we use in class. The first ten numbers in this system are as follows: (The phonetic pronunciation is in brackets) 1 Ha-na (han_ah) 2 Dul (dool) 3 Set (set) 4 Net (net) 5 Da-Seot (das_ol) 6 Yeo-Seot (yas_ol) 7 Il-gop […]

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1 Step Sparring

Ilbo Matsoki 4th Kup + This is the most important type of pre-arranged sparring, and one of the most important aspects of TaekwonDo training. Both attacker and defender start in parallel ready stance. Attacker moves forwards into Walking stance, obverse punch. Kihap before each attack. The defender kihaps to indicate they are ready (both sides).  Always kihap on the counter attack. Blocks and counter attacks are performed effectively and with […]

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Semi-Free Sparring

Ban Jayoo Matsoki 7th Kup + This form of sparring is designed as a step forward from basic three step sparring. It involves three consecutive attacks (hand or feet) and three blocks or evasions, plus a counter attack. Three step semi-free sparring should not be hurried, the secret is reaction force and quick, intelligent movements. Attacking students start in right L stance guarding block Defending students start in parallel ready […]

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3 Step Sparring

Sambo MatsokiThree step sparring is designed for the beginner to learn distance, focus and movement using basic techniques. Correct technique and movement are much more important than speed and power (certainly at a junior level). This is the first time junior students will have faced a ‘real’ opponent, so controlling the power/speed of attacks and blocks in accordance with their experience is important.3 step sparring is quite formal – all […]

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